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3 Apps That Will Help You Return to Long-form Reads

2 weeks ago

How do you keep up with the world? The new movement taking hold of our social feeds or that explosive interview everyone won’t stop talking about? This is where your favourite Instagram fails and Facebook disappoints. Here are 3 apps that capture the zeitgeist, and bring the best long-form reads under your radar – even if you’re short on time.

Audm, audm app, best app for long-form reads

Audm

If your biggest excuse for not getting around that trending op ed piece from last week is “Where is the time?” Audm saves the day. The app turns long-form journalism into professionally narrated digital audio. It makes the long commute to work thoroughly enjoyable! Tune in to pieces from publishing giants such as Wired, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Esquire, Harper’s Bazaar, Foreign Policy, The New York Review of Books, Outside Magazine, ProPublica, London Review of Books, Backchannel, and several others.

pocket, pocket app, best apps for long-form reads

Pocket

Discovering a new read you want to dive right into is great, but that deadline you’re rushing against isn’t going anywhere. Intend to get around to a link later? Save it for a read – offline! – via the Pocket app. This also helps if you’re a frequent traveller, looking to bide time mid-air in those wifi-less hours. It’s quick to learn about the subjects you’re leaning towards. Oh, and it helps you tag and neatly organise your articles so you can return to them at ease. It also delivers a tailored list of recommended reads straight to your inbox.

Instapaper, instapaper app, best apps for long-form reads

Instapaper

Another “read it later” app, with major benefits. For one, you can read the piece in your preferred font. Two: If you’re reading an article for research, it lets you highlight text as you read along. Also, comment on text in any article. Plus, you can easily store it, retrieve it, quote it and share it. Three: Follow other power users and catch up on their recommended reads. Another handy feature tells you approximately how much time it will take you to read the feature. Sounds pretty neat!